Flossin’ Ain’t Just For G’s: You Should Be Flossing Your Teeth Every Single Day

We’ve been flossin’ all of our lives. When you had on a new outfit in elementary school, you’d strut to the pencil sharpener to show off your new threads. After spending all afternoon washing your car and rubbing it down with Armor All, you would cruise around the block at two miles per hour so everyone saw you. Now, you can floss on social media for the whole world to see. But, when was the last time you flossed your grill? If you’re trying to stunt way into your golden years, it’s going to be hard if your teeth are looking like fossils. 

According to the American Dental Association, interdental cleaners such as floss are “an essential part of taking care of your teeth and gums.” 

Your toothbrush and Scope can only do so much. Flossing helps remove food and bacteria stuck between your teeth and along the gumline. If you don’t remove it, it turns into plaque which turns into tooth decay and gingivitis (aka the first stage of gum disease) and then tooth loss.

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Dentist Greg Gelfand, D.D.S., told SELF, he can tell when a patient is lying about flossing—and your dentist should be able to tell, too. (You have seen your dentist this year, right?)

 

“I usually see bleeding gums, a high rate of cavities, bone loss, and bad breath in people who don’t make flossing a habit,” he said.

 

Dr. Gelfand and other oral experts say you should floss every time you brush. That may not be realistic so, he says at least once a day is fine and to rinse your mouth out with a mouthwash after you brush to remove displaced particles that didn’t stick to the floss.

And finally, if the traditional string of floss doesn’t excite you, or maybe your teeth are too close together and harder to get in between than two overweight people on the subway, there are other options that achieve the same level of clean as flossing

If your breath smells like the deadly liquid dripping from the garbage truck and when you spit in the sink after brushing it looks like there was a crime scene in your mouth, there’s your sign you should be flossing more. If you’re still not convinced, floss after you brush your teeth. Are you seeing any particulars being picked up? That’s what brushing and vigorous swishing is leaving you with.

 

Dr. Gelfand and other oral experts say you should floss every time you brush. That may not be realistic so, he says at least once a day is fine and to rinse your mouth out with a mouthwash after you brush to remove displaced particles that didn’t stick to the floss.

 

And finally, if the traditional string of floss doesn’t excite you, or maybe your teeth are too close together and harder to get in between than two overweight people on the subway, there are other options that achieve the same level of clean as flossing.